3-Month Gap Between 2 Doses More Effective For Oxford COVID Vaccine: Study

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The process of vaccination against COVID-19 is on in full swing in several countries.

But the debate continues on what is the ideal interval between jabs in case of those vaccines which need two doses.

According to a study published in The Lancet, a three-month interval between doses is likely to be more effective than a six-week interval for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

Analysis from a phase 3 randomised controlled trial suggests that the first dose of the vaccine offers 76 per cent protection for up to three months.

This will allow countries which are using the Oxford vaccine to inoculate a larger percentage of the population more rapidly.

“Where there is a limited supply, policies of initially vaccinating more people with a single dose may provide greater immediate population protection than vaccinating half the number of people with two doses,” said lead author of the study Professor Andrew Pollard of University of Oxford.

Combined data from randomised controlled trials in the UK (8948 people), Brazil (6753) and South Africa (1,477) were used for the study.

Vaccine efficacy in case of single vaccine dose, from 22 days to 3 months after vaccination, was 76 per cent. This protection did not reduce over 3 months. Also, antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein stayed at the same levels for 3 months.

“In the long term, a second dose should ensure long-lived immunity, and so we encourage everyone who has had their first vaccine to ensure they receive both doses,” Pollard said.

3-month gap between 2 doses more effective for Oxford vaccine: Study

The process of vaccination against COVID-19 is on in full swing in several countries.

But the debate continues on what is the ideal interval between jabs in case of those vaccines which need two doses.

According to a study published in The Lancet, a three-month interval between doses is likely to be more effective than a six-week interval for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

Analysis from a phase 3 randomised controlled trial suggests that the first dose of the vaccine offers 76 per cent protection for up to three months.

This will allow countries which are using the Oxford vaccine to inoculate a larger percentage of the population more rapidly.

“Where there is a limited supply, policies of initially vaccinating more people with a single dose may provide greater immediate population protection than vaccinating half the number of people with two doses,” said lead author of the study Professor Andrew Pollard of University of Oxford.

Combined data from randomised controlled trials in the UK (8948 people), Brazil (6753) and South Africa (1,477) were used for the study.

Vaccine efficacy in case of single vaccine dose, from 22 days to 3 months after vaccination, was 76 per cent. This protection did not reduce over 3 months. Also, antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein stayed at the same levels for 3 months.

“In the long term, a second dose should ensure long-lived immunity, and so we encourage everyone who has had their first vaccine to ensure they receive both doses,” Pollard said.

Also Read: Good News: Oxford Vaccine Very Effective In Controlling Transmission Of COVID-19

Also Read: UK Plans To Delay 2nd Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine; Here’s Why

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